Based on Public Health Data, Mayor Scott Eases COVID-19 Restrictions

Crest of the City of Baltimore

Brandon M. Scott
Mayor,
Baltimore City
250 City Hall - Baltimore Maryland 21202
(410) 396-3835 - Fax: (410) 576-9425

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT
Monica Lewis
(410) 387-8378

monica.lewis@baltimorecity.gov

BALTIMORE, MD (Wednesday, February 17, 2021) – Today, Mayor Brandon M. Scott and Baltimore City Health Commissioner Dr. Letitia Dzirasa announced that Baltimore City will modify its COVID-19 mandates in accordance with sustained improvements in key public health indicators and in consultation with hospital partners. Restriction modifications will take effect at 6:00 a.m. on Monday, February 22, 2021.

“I continue to be encouraged by the continuous downward trend we see in our numbers,” said Mayor Brandon M. Scott. “More than halfway through February, our new cases are down approximately 48%, deaths are down 6%, and our positivity rate is down 50%. I want to thank Baltimoreans for adhering to the public health guidelines and doing their part to slow the spread of COVID-19 in our city.”

The following changes will take effect at 6:00 a.m. on Monday, February 22, 2021:

  • Gatherings: All gatherings must comply with any relevant occupancy based upon the space in which they are located.
  • Food Service Establishments, Bars, and Breweries: One-hour max time limit is removed. Restaurants must continue to maintain a sign-in/sign-out sheet for both patrons and staff.
  • Fitness: Gym classes are permitted at 25% occupancy or 10 people, whichever is higher.
  • Live Performances: Live performances are permitted as long as performers wear masks and adhere to social distancing. Note: Adult Entertainment remains prohibited at this time.
  • Organized Sports: Organized amateur sports events, including high school, youth, and/or recreational games, clinics, skills sessions, scrimmages and practices, are permitted in accordance with the dates and guidance from the Baltimore City Department of Recreation and Parks.
    • Tournaments and organized amateur sports events with teams from outside the State of Maryland are prohibited.
    • Face coverings should be worn by all participants engaged in the field of play and everyone present.
    • Indoor amateur sports events are limited to 25% occupancy, provided there are no more than 50 people per activity area.
  • Maximum Occupancy” means:
    • 25% of the maximum occupancy load of the Facility under the applicable fire code as set forth on a certificate issued for the Facility by a local fire code official.
    • If no such certificate has been issued for the Facility by the local fire code official, the maximum occupancy of the Facility pursuant to applicable laws, regulations, and permits.

“Washing your hands, wearing a well-fitted, multi-layered face covering over your nose and mouth, and keeping your distance helps to limit the spread of COVID-19,” said Health Commissioner Dr. Letitia Dzirasa. “With the help of Baltimore City residents, by following these guidelines, we will continue to see our case rates go down and our hospitalizations decrease.”

“Baltimore City continues to have one of the lowest positivity rates in the State but residents and visitors must remain vigilant,” continued Mayor Scott. “Everyone must continue to wear face coverings, practice physical distancing, and avoid large gatherings if we want to continue to build on these gains and keep our community safe.”

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